Ms. Buyer is a regular columnist for the THE BULLETIN of the Bar Association of Erie County and is a contributor to No Jitter. Previously, she has written numerous commentaries on telecommunications law for other legal and telecommunications publications including, among others, The Daily Record, Communications Convergence and Computer Telephony. Her articles cover a broad range of topics highlighting current telecommunications issues including federal and state telecommunications policy, litigation, wireless technologies, spectrum policy, FCC initiatives, and industry consolidation. Martha Buyer has also contributed to the ABA Journal Report.

Monday
Oct022017

Changing Broadband Definitions

It’s hard to imagine that this is a political issue, but it’s a very hot one!
 
It’s a question that’s almost as old as the one about the chicken and egg.  If too many kids are failing a test, is the test too hard, or are kids not working hard enough, or not being taught sufficiently well, to master the material necessary to pass?  Across the spectrum from education to business to sports, and now to internet access, this question is asked thousands of times when, for any number of reasons (some of them even good reasons), defined benchmarks are missed. 

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Wednesday
Sep202017

Hurricanes and Spoofers

Aggressive telemarketers—or marketers in general—have a long, successful history of seizing opportunities and running with them.  In fact, this is what all good marketers always intend to do regardless of industry.  Certainly those marketers have relied on (and often exceeded the boundaries of) the ever-evolving rules established by the Telecommunications Consumer Protection Act (TCPA,  47 U.S.C. 227), signed into law in 1991 by President George H. W. Bush.  You’d likely be accused—at least in this industry—of living under a rock if you’d never heard of  or been affected by it, either when the landline rang at dinnertime, or when your mobile device received calls or texts from unidentified or familiar-looking numbers trying to offer you a vacation, free money, or home repair services.

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Wednesday
Aug022017

Telephony Elegy for Rural America

AT&T, Verizon looking to change rules for copper infrastructure retirement
Earlier this summer, I read J.D. Vance’s eye-opening book Hillbilly Elegy. A memoir about growing up in a poor and unusual family in Southeastern Ohio, this story raised much larger questions for me in terms of how we, as American society, support communities where economic and other associated challenges (unemployment, crime, drugs, among other systemic problems) make breaking the cycle of poverty difficult.

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Monday
Jun262017

Legal Issues to Consider as IoT Becomes Way of Life

Recently I got a new car. I love its many features, including, among other things, on-board GPS.  But my car, like zillions of things around me, is now generating data about where I drive, how fast I go, how much gas I burn (etc.) There is much information to be culled from my car’s embedded sophisticated technology (who knew, for example, that by going from 89 to 93 octane, the mileage would improve by a whopping 6 miles per gallon?).  But the flip side is that my car is generating a great deal of information about me that may be used by the manufacturer or anyone else to whom it sells data about me and thousands—if not hundreds of thousands—of car owners like me.

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Tuesday
May232017

Understanding Cyberattack Liabilities

Be vigilant, and take corrective actions to keep systems up to date... or risk being sued.

Earlier this month cyberattacks dominated the news as 16 health care facilities (mostly major hospitals in the U.K. ) lost access to patient data to hackers who demanded payment in exchange for its "return." Rather than simply creating a risk and inconvenience by accessing what was supposed to be secure, confidential information (read: credit card data) as previous hacks have done, in this case, the culprits placed lives in jeopardy because of the critical information they "data-napped." Sadly, in the case of this particular hack, Microsoft warned users of an identified vulnerability and provided a patch to address it two weeks before the attack.

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